top of page
  • Writer's pictureCoach Tree_Triston

12 Protein Sources for Vegans and Vegetarians


A common concern about vegetarian and vegan diets is that they might lack sufficient protein.

However, many experts agree that a well-planned vegetarian or vegan diet can provide you with all the nutrients you need.

That said, certain plant foods contain significantly more protein than others.

And higher-protein diets can promote muscle strength, satiety and weight loss.

Here are 12 plant foods that contain a high amount of protein per serving

1. Seitan Seitan is a popular protein source for many vegetarians and vegans.

It's made from gluten, the main protein in wheat. Unlike many soy-based mock meats, it resembles the look and texture of meat when cooked.

Also known as wheat meat or wheat gluten, it contains about 25 grams of protein per 3.5 ounces (100 grams). This makes it the richest plant protein source on this list.

.Seitan can be pan-fried, sautéed and even grilled. Therefore, it can be easily incorporated in a variety of recipes.

However, seitan should be avoided by people with celiac disease or gluten sensitivity.

2. Tofu, Tempeh, Edamame Tofu, tempeh and edamame all originate from soybeans.

Soybeans are considered a whole source of protein. This means that they provide the body with all the essential amino acids it needs.

Edamame are immature soybeans with a sweet and slightly grassy taste. They need to be steamed or boiled prior to consumption and can be eaten on their own or added to soups and salads.

Tofu is made from bean curds pressed together in a process similar to cheese making. Tempeh is made by cooking and slightly fermenting mature soybeans prior to pressing them into a patty.

All three contain iron, calcium and 10-19 grams of protein per 3.5 ounces (100 grams).

Edamame are also rich in folate, vitamin K and fiber. Tempeh contains a good amount of probiotics, B vitamins and minerals such as magnesium and phosphorus.

3. Lentils At 18 grams of protein per cooked cup (240 ml), lentils are a great source of protein.

Lentils also contain good amounts of slowly digested carbs, and a single cup (240 ml) provides approximately 50% of your recommended daily fiber intake.

Furthermore, the type of fiber found in lentils has been shown to feed the good bacteria in your colon, promoting a healthy gut. Lentils may also help reduce the risk of heart disease, diabetes, excess body weight and some types of cancer.

In addition, lentils are rich in folate, manganese and iron. They also contain a good amount of antioxidants and other health-promoting plant compounds.

4. Chickpeas and Most Varieties of Beans Kidney, black, pinto and most other varieties of beans contain high amounts of protein per serving.

Chickpeas, also known as garbanzo beans, are another legume with a high protein content.

Both beans and chickpeas contain about 15 grams of protein per cooked cup (240 ml). They are also excellent sources of complex carbs, fiber, iron, folate, phosphorus, potassium, manganese and several beneficial plant compounds.

Moreover, several studies show that a diet rich in beans and other legumes can decrease cholesterol, help control blood sugar levels, lower blood pressure and even reduce belly fat.

5. Hempseed  Hempseed comes from the Cannabis sativa plant, which is notorious for belonging to the same family as the marijuana plant.

Although not as well-known as other seeds, hempseed contains 10 grams of complete, easily digestible protein per ounce (28 grams). That's 50% more than chia seeds and flaxseeds.

Hempseed also contains a good amount of magnesium, iron, calcium, zinc and selenium. What's more, it's a good source of omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids in the ratio considered optimal for human health.

Interestingly, some studies indicate that the type of fats found in hempseed may help reduce inflammation, as well as diminish symptoms of PMS, menopause and certain skin diseases.

You can add hempseed to your diet by sprinkling some in your smoothie or morning muesli. It can also be used in homemade salad dressings or protein bars.

6. Green Peas The little green peas often served as a side dish contain 9 grams of protein per cooked cup (240 ml), which is slightly more than a cup of milk.

What's more, a serving of green peas covers more than 25% of your daily fiber, vitamin A, C, K, thiamine, folate and manganese requirements.

Green peas are also a good source of iron, magnesium, phosphorus, zinc, copper and several other B vitamins.

You can use peas in recipes such as pea and basil stuffed ravioli, thai-inspired pea soup or pea and avocado guacamole.

7. Spirulina This blue-green algae is definitely a nutritional powerhouse.

Two tablespoons (30 ml) provide you with 8 grams of complete protein, in addition to covering 22% of your daily requirements of iron and thiamin and 42% of your daily copper needs.

Spirulina also contains decent amounts of magnesium, riboflavin, manganese, potassium and small amounts of most of the other nutrients your body needs, including essential fatty acids.

Furthermore, studies link consuming spirulina to health benefits ranging from a stronger immune system and reduced blood pressure to improved blood sugar and cholesterol levels.

8. Amaranth and Quinoa Although often referred to as ancient or gluten-free grains, amaranth and quinoa don't grow from grasses like other cereal grains do.

For this reason, they're technically considered "pseudo-cereals."

Nevertheless, they can be prepared or ground into flours similar to more commonly known grains.

Amaranth and quinoa provide 8–9 grams of protein per cooked cup (240 ml) and are complete sources of protein, which is rare among grains and pseudo-cereals.

Also, amaranth and quinoa are good sources of complex carbs, fiber, iron, manganese, phosphorus and magnesium. 

9. Ezekiel Bread Ezekiel bread is made from organic, sprouted whole grains and legumes. These include wheat, millet, barley and spelt, as well as soybeans and lentils.

Two slices of Ezekiel bread contain approximately 8 grams of protein, which is slightly more than the average bread.

Sprouting grains and legumes increases the amount of healthy nutrients they contain and reduces the amount of anti-nutrients in them.

Similarly, combining grains with legumes could further improve the bread's amino acid profile.

Sprouting also seems to increase the bread's soluble fiber, folate, vitamin C, vitamin E and beta-carotene content. It may also slightly reduce the gluten content, which can enhance digestion in those sensitive to gluten.

10. Soy Milk Milk that's made from soybeans and fortified with vitamins and minerals is a great alternative to cow's milk.

Not only does it contain 7 grams of protein per cup (240 ml), but it's also an excellent source of calcium, vitamin D and vitamin B12.

However, keep in mind that soy milk and soybeans do not naturally contain vitamin B12, so picking a fortified variety is recommended.

Soy milk is found in most supermarkets. It's an incredibly versatile product that can be consumed on its own or in a variety of cooking and baking recipes.

It is a good idea to opt for unsweetened varieties to keep the amount of added sugars to a minimum.

11. Oats and Oatmeal  Oats are an easy and delicious way to add protein to any diet.

Half a cup (120 ml) of dry oats provides you with approximately 6 grams of protein and 4 grams of fiber. This portion also contains good amounts of magnesium, zinc, phosphorus and folate.

Although oats are not considered a complete protein, they do contain higher-quality protein than other commonly consumed grains like rice and wheat.

You can use oats in a variety of recipes ranging from oatmeal to veggie burgers. They can also be ground into flour and used for baking.

12. Chia Seeds Chia seeds are derived from the Salvia hispanica plant, which is native to Mexico and Guatemala.

At 6 grams of protein and 13 grams of fiber per 1.25 ounces (35 grams), chia seeds definitely deserve their spot on this list.

What's more, these little seeds contain a good amount of iron, calcium, selenium and magnesium, as well as omega-3 fatty acids, antioxidants and various other beneficial plant compounds.

They're also incredibly versatile. Chia seeds have a bland taste and are able to absorb water, turning into a gel-like substance. This makes them an easy addition to a variety of recipes, ranging from smoothies to baked goods and chia puddings.

Take Home Message

Protein deficiencies among vegetarians and vegans are far from being the norm.

Nonetheless, some people may be interested in increasing their plant protein intake for a variety of reasons.

This list can be used as a guide for anyone interested in incorporating more plant-based proteins into their diet.

Source article: https://www.healthline.com/nutrition/protein-for-vegans-vegetarians#section18 Copyright © 2019 Sportdynamics Circuit Training, All rights reserved. You are receiving this email because you hired in with Triston Mitchell

Our mailing address is: Sportdynamics Circuit Training3240 Bagley Ave Apt 3Los Angeles, CA 90034-2913 Add us to your address book

Want to change how you receive these emails? You can update your preferences or unsubscribe from this list.

📷

6 views0 comments

Recent Posts

See All

SPDx Body in Balance

3 Round Circuit Equipment needed: Suspension straps - Medicine Ball - Kettlebell or 2 Dumbbells 1st Round - 40 seconds work/20 seconds rest 2nd Round - 30 seconds work/15 seconds rest Final Round - 20

Comments


Post: Blog2_Post
bottom of page